Bartenders urged to get U.G.L.Y for charity

08 July, 2019 by Andy Young

The Leukaemia Foundation is once again on the lookout for big hearted bartenders who will get U.G.L.Y for a good cause this August.

The U.G.L.Y Bartender of the Year competition is back next month, with one slight change that will see Australia’s bartenders compete for one national title. For the first time, this year will see the highest fundraiser take home the inaugural trophy for the National Bartender of the Year, instead of the state-by-state awards of previous years.

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Bartenders are invited to register now for the heart-warming community fundraiser which raises vital funds to provide a home-away-from-home for Australians facing blood cancers like leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma.

Leukaemia Foundation CEO Bill Petch said the U.G.L.Y. Bartender of the Year competition was Australia’s largest hospitality charity fundraiser, and has now raised an amazing $13m, helping to provide more than 160,000 nights of accommodation for regional Australians forced to relocate to capital cities for life-saving treatment.

“U.G.L.Y stands for Understanding, Generous, Likeable, You and this label really reflects the kind-hearted and giving natures of bartenders in our clubs, pubs and hotels, which are often the heartbeat of Australian communities,” Petch said.

U.G.L.Y. Bartenders host a variety of fundraising events from BBQ’s and family festivals to open mic and karaoke nights, all to bring the local community together to have fun while supporting an important cause.

“Unfortunately, most regional and rural Australians who are diagnosed with a blood cancer will have to leave their home, work and local community to relocate to a major city for their treatment. Funds raised by these amazing venues and their bartenders ensures a safe home while undergoing life-saving treatment,” Petch said.

“This vital support takes away the financial and emotional burden of finding and paying for accommodation, allowing them to focus on the most important thing – getting well. It also means families can stay together, close to their loved one during treatment, for as long as they need.”

There are currently around 100,000 Australian’s living with blood cancer. Close to 13,000 Australians are diagnosed with a blood cancer like leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma every year, and recent analysis shows the number will increase to around 17,000 people. This is close to two people every hour, every day.

Bartenders are urged to register now at www.uglybartender.org.au.